Drug War


7
Dec 07

Friday morning rapid fire


5
Jul 07

Finding humor in the little things

From CNN.com

Al Gore’s son was arrested early Wednesday on suspicion of possessing marijuana and prescription drugs after deputies pulled him over for speeding, authorities say.

Al Gore III, 24, was driving a blue Toyota Prius about 100 mph on the San Diego Freeway when he was pulled over about 2:15 a.m., Sheriff’s Department spokesman Jim Amormino said.

This isn’t too surprising, he’s been arrested for marijuana before IIRC, but he was dumb (and probably arrogant enough) enough to be going 100 miles an hour while while carrying an illegal drug and four(!) prescription drugs not prescribed to him. In a Prius, which makes it all much funnier.


29
Jun 07

Local drug war update

Today’s newspaper brought mixed results. The Atlanta Police Department does seem to be cleaning itself up, indeed, much more than I expected. However, I haven’t read anything about any sort of judicial accountability; they’re the ones who approve the warrants, seemingly without even looking at them.

Rant Starts
Meanwhile, people like this guy send exactly the wrong message with his “How not to get busted” DVD series. The point of drug legalization is not to evade the law or get high, it’s to live in a free society where people can make their own mistakes and take responsibility for them. Instead we revive the notion of demonic possession in the form of “addiction” which is a “disease”, which is at the same time pitiful and criminal and a reason to treat us all like children in the hands of an all-knowing state.

The end result of protecting people from the consequences of their actions is to fill the world with fools, and that seems to be what we’ve done.
Rant Ends


12
Jun 07

Signs of progress

In policing Atlanta anyway

Atlanta police have virtually stopped seeking search warrants for drugs following the November shooting of an elderly woman and dropped — at least temporarily — the forced-entry tactics that led to her death, court records show.

In the six months since Kathryn Johnston died in a botched police raid, Atlanta narcotics officers have not sought a single “no-knock” search warrant, court records show. They served at least 25 no-knock warrants during a comparable six-month period a year earlier.

Reason has prevailed, at least temporarily.


10
Feb 07

Three things


11
Jan 07

Atlanta cop update

See Report: Lies involved in no-knock warrant and Town hall meeting to discuss “no-knock” warrants. The systems seems to be working, albeit quite slowly. I’d assumed that since this feel out of the news for a month that it was being covered up, it’s nice to see that I might be wrong about that.


9
Jan 07

Not surprising

Cop wounded in drug raid that killed woman to retire

Curiously, the name of the APD spokesman is James Polite, which is just kind of eerie. If that’s your name, are you destined for some kind of PR occupation?


27
Aug 06

Why doesn’t the AJC have editors?

This is easily the most poorly written article I’ve seen in a long time. Granted, its all filler, and contains no new data. And being, the AJC, it mentions diversity (for no obvious reason) at least twice. The bolding defies explanation as well. Some strange passages:

It’s no secret in the world of big-time drug trafficking, federal agents say: If you want to be a major player in interstate drug peddling you have to have an operation in metro Atlanta.

Recent multimillion-dollar drug busts suggest that Gwinnett County has become that place in metro Atlanta for these drug cartels.


In 2005, Gwinnett’s local task force seized a total of $34 million in illegal drugs. Those figures dwarf the amount of drugs seized in surrounding counties. A Cobb County drug task force, for example, seized $9 million in illegal drugs last year.

The words flow like a piano through a blender.


9
Jun 06

Friday round up


Quotes That Caught My Eye
Eric Hoffer

  • The poor on the borderline of starvation live purposeful lives. To be engaged in a desperate struggle for food and shelter is to be wholly free from a sense of futility.
  • We lie the loudest when we lie to ourselves.
  • It is thus with most of us; we are what other people say we are. We know ourselves chiefly by hearsay.

Ambrose Bierce

  • Acquaintance, n.: A person whom we know well enough to borrow from, but not well enough to lend to.
  • There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we don’t know.
  • To be positive: To be mistaken at the top of one’s voice.

H.L. Mencken

  • An idealist is one who, on noticing that a rose smells better than a cabbage, concludes that it will also make better soup.
  • Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard.
  • Faith may be defined briefly as an illogical belief in the occurrence of the improbable.
  • Every decent man is ashamed of the government he lives under.
  • I believe that all government is evil, and that trying to improve it is largely a waste of time.
  • It is even harder for the average ape to believe that he has descended from man.
  • Say what you will about the Ten Commandments, you must always come back to the pleasant fact that there are only ten of them.
  • The capacity of human beings to bore one another seems to be vastly greater than that of any other animal.

22
Mar 06

Well worth watching

On a related note, everyone should check out the most recent BloggingHeads, which features a very interesting dialogue between James Pinkerton and Mickey Kaus. Very good bigthink about the future (and a lovely new term, technological determinism) and immigration.

One quibble is that he reiterates the theory held by most people, which is that we could reduce illegal immigration to a trickle without much effort by building a wall. It’s similar to the thought that we could win the drug war if only we tried harder.

The government can’t keep drugs out of prisons, and the Soviets had the biggest police state in history, and they had tremendous drug problems. It’s ridiculous to think while we can’t successfully ban inanimate objects, we can successfully ban animate ones.

I imagine we’ll do what we’re doing with the drug war, which is spend a lot of money and civil liberties to create self-perpetuating interest groups (much like the classic bootleggers and Baptists unions of the prohibition era) and to deal with the actual problems as poorly as possible.

For the record I think sanctions on employers is the most effective way of dealing with the total number of illegal immigrants (not that it will do that much) and the main thing we should be doing (if we insist on some collective action) is to rapidly Americanize the immigrants that are here. Put simply, we need to change the Mexicans living here into Americans of Hispanic descent and throw this whole notion of multiculturalism away (the illegal immigrants did).